Home > Awards > 2015 Awards – Winners > Building Culture for Technology Entrepreneurship in Developing Contexts Coller Institute of Venture 2015 Research Grant, awarded to Dr. Brett Anitra Gilbert, Rutgers Business School

Building Culture for Technology Entrepreneurship in Developing Contexts Coller Institute of Venture 2015 Research Grant, awarded to Dr. Brett Anitra Gilbert, Rutgers Business School

Dr. Brett Anitra Gilbert
Dr. Brett Anitra Gilbert

Brett is an associate professor (with tenure) in the Department of Management and Global Business at Rutgers Business School – Newark and New Brunswick. She received her Ph.D. in Entrepreneurship from Indiana University, and her B.A. in Management from Wittenberg University. Her overarching research interest can be described as seeking to understand the conditions under which new ventures thrive. It spans the geographic cluster, alliances, innovation, internationalization and performance streams of literature. Current projects examine emerging technology communities in developing market contexts and assess the emergence of “clean” energy technologies in the marketplace. Her research is currently published or forthcoming in the Journal of Business Venturing, Journal of International Business Studies, Journal of Management, Research Policy, Small Business Economics Journal, Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal, and Strategic Management Journal.

Brett is also an associate editor for Small Business Economics Journal, and on the editorial review board for the Journal of Business Venturing and Journal of International Business Studies. From 2008-2010 she completed a gubernatorial appointment as an advisory committee member for the Texas Emerging Technology Fund and from 2012-2015 she served as a Representative-At-Large for the Academy of Management Entrepreneurship Division. Brett is delighted to be a 2015 Coller Grant recipient.

About the Project

This research examines the role that local culture plays in enabling or hindering technology entrepreneurship. It investigates this question through six different developing contexts where technology entrepreneurship has been slow to emerge relative to other regions in each respective country. The regions examined include Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; He fei, China; Medellin, Colombia; Kolkata, IN; Newark, NJ; and Johannesburg, South Africa. The specific research questions pursued are in what way(s) does local culture influence an individual’s ability, propensity or decision to create technology ventures, and in what ways do local institutions need to change local culture to promote technology entrepreneurship? Brett and her research team will spend several months in each country to collect the data that is needed to answer these questions.