Home > Coller Institute News > “De-Know-Polization” Featured at the Israeli Tech Transfer Conference 6-Feb-2017 | Tel Aviv

“De-Know-Polization” Featured at the Israeli Tech Transfer Conference 6-Feb-2017 | Tel Aviv


Prof. Yesha Sivan, Executive Director of the Coller Institute of Venture, gave a keynote lecture at the Israeli Tech Transfer Conference (6-Feb-2017 in Tel Aviv), and spoke of De-Know-Polization – the de-monopolization of knowledge, extensively covered in Issue 4 of Coller Venture Review.

Previously featured also at the Jerusalem Post, “De-Know-Polization” is a global phenomenon spanning academic institutions worldwide and stripping universities of their traditional roles: research, teaching, and societal service. University leaders will need to take actions in order to keep their university running, and justify these actions to their public and private funders, including students paying tuition and taxpayers.

Our message to university leaders and policy-makers, further elaborated in the recent issue of Coller Venture Review is to be aware of the various threats and opportunities, particularly when it comes to the evolving role of universities within the evolving venture ecosystem. Don’t think business is as usual – business as usual now means no business at all in the future. Better you lead the change than let the change lead you.

The future of venture and universities will be further elaborated at #CIV2017HK – the 2017 Annual Conference of the Coller Institute of Venture in Hong Kong (22-26 April 2017). Join us there to meet venture leaders from all over the world, define new pathways for venture and design the universities of the future. Register today!

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