Recent Posts

NZVIF Stops Investing Taxpayer Money: Mission Accomplished or Incomplete?

新西兰创业投资基金停止用纳税人的钱投资:任务已经完成还是尚未结束?NZVIF, a New Zealand Government Fund-of-Funds, announced a transition to a "self-sustaining commercial model" after 14 years of investing taxpayer money in venture capital, with mixed results. In the 1990s, policymakers in the world’s neoliberal bastions began funding venture capital managers. Intervention in building VC markets suggests that either neoliberal policy-makers have hit ‘the limits of laissez-faire’, or that the free economy – at least with respect to venture capital activity – is planned. What we don’t yet know, and what warrants further investigation, is whether these interventionist efforts last. An editorial by Robyn Klingler-Vidra, Head of the CIV Policy Strand

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Staying on the City Growth Treadmill

The city can be viewed as a treadmill of businesses all running at the right pace to remain in their position. City leaders need to develop a clear image of their current portfolio of businesses on this treadmill to identify the strategies they need to drive to ensure the continued growth of the region. Whilst there is no single action a city leader can take to keep the business moving, they have a critical role in understanding the subtle interconnection between these businesses to identify the interventions at their disposal that have most likelihood of success. A guest post by Rashik Parmar, MBE, IBM-UK Lead Cloud Advisor.

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The Coller School of Management Inaugurated at Tel-Aviv University

Jeremy Coller, founder of the Coller Institute of Venture, has donated $50 million to the Tel-Aviv University School of Management. The incredibly generous donation was allocated for research and development, study programs and teaching. On May 19, 2016, the new Coller School of Management was inaugurated in a ceremony attended by Coller and his family, TAU leadership, faculty members and the CIV team.

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A Key Management Lesson from the 19th Century

来自十九世纪关于公司管理的重要一课 Charles Babbage had been working for years on his vision of a mechanical programmable computer, the “Analytical Engine”. Being a mathematical genius, he nevertheless did not understand the need to relinquish the management reins to his apprentice, Ada Lovelace - and failed miserably. The transfer of power from the founders to a capable CEO was, apparently, an issue in Victorian England - and still is today. A guest post on the history of venture by Nathan Zeldes, CIV Research Affiliate.

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